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Announcements

Mission

Principal

From the desk of Principal/CEO, Bruce Kelly—

My appointment as the Principal to Raisbeck Aviation High School is a professional honor. After serving for three years as the Assistant Principal, I am thrilled to build upon the legacy championed by our own amazing visionary, Ms. Reba Gilman.

With any leadership transition, change is inevitable. However, my commitment to each stakeholder is to carry the torch of our mission and guiding principles forward. RAHS remains focused on addressing the critical gaps in the aerospace workforce and being responsive to industry needs.

Keeping our distinction as a Lighthouse model of STEM excellence and building upon the vibrant partnership with The Museum of Flight is important. With that backdrop, I think it is helpful to briefly touch on the next school initiative, replication. Simply put, replication means RAHS is positioned to export our signature programs or the entire school model across the region, state, and nation. It is noted that we began last year by exporting elements of our career readiness program to the Highline School District. That’s a great start. Looking ahead, I see remarkable opportunities tied to our model of Project Based Learning and showcasing our school-museum partnership. I think you would agree that replication represents a very robust initiative.

RAHS shines as a remarkable institution for teaching and learning. On any given day, our students, staff, industry and community supporters, PTSA, and alumni create a culture that was best described by Dr. James Raisbeck. After a recent visit, he quipped, “RAHS is a continual pep rally of learning.” I now consider his phrase as my second favorite motto—just below “The Sky is Not the Limit!”

This fall, RAHS celebrates the 10th anniversary of sharing that motto—hooray for us! In that same vein, I have the personal privilege and professional honor to lead and extend our legacy. I am excited to launch the next decade with you and want to thank you in advance for cheering me on.

My best,

Bruce Kelly

News

  • Highline Bond Falls Short of 60% Approval

    The Highline bond measure has failed to reach the 60 percent approval needed for passage. With nearly all ballots counted, the bond has received 59.3 percent of the vote. "The challenge we face has not gone away. We still have to replace aging schools and build new schools to address overcrowding and growing enrollment," said Superintendent Susan Enfield.

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  • Make the Most of Student Conferences

    Student conferences are coming the week of November 24. Conferences are an opportunity for students, families and teachers to celebrate student success, identify needs, and establish strong relationships. This is one of the ways Highline partners with families to increase student achievement.

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  • Take Part in the Sixth-Grade Transition Planning

    Planning for the sixth-grade move to middle school has begun, and you can be a part of it. You are invited to a community meeting on Thursday, December 11, to learn about the plan and give your feedback.

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  • Small Gifts Make a Big Impact

    A small gift to the Highline Schools Foundation today will make a big impact on our students and schools. Now, supporting the foundation is as easy as sending a text message.

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  • Highline Bond Failing

    It appears that the Highline capital improvement bond -- now at 59.28 percent approval -- will not reach the 60 percent needed for passage. Though yes votes have been trending upward, it is unlikely the ballots yet to be counted will push the final count above the 60 percent threshold.

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Important Dates

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Building for Tomorrow Today
We face two critical issues as a school district: aging buildings and crowded schools. A bond measure that addresses these issues was on the November ballot. Learn more about the election here. Help us build for tomorrow, today.

Highline Public Schools has a new video that illustrates our bold goals for students. The animated five-minute video follows a family on Highline's "path to success," telling the story without a single word.